Tuesday, October 22, 2019
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What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer?

There are some breast cancer risks you can reduce.

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers.

Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older. And while breast cancer is a common cancer in women, there are risk factors you can address when you are younger.

Presently, the average risk of a woman in the United States developing breast cancer sometime in her life is about 12%.

This means there is a 1 in 8 chance she will develop breast cancer, but it also means there is a 7 in 8 chance she will never have the disease. 

Some women will get breast cancer even without any other risk factors that they know of. Having a risk factor does not mean you will get the disease, and not all risk factors have the same effect. If you have breast cancer risk factors, talk with your doctor about ways you can lower your risk and about screening for breast cancer.

There are two types of risk factors: Those you cannot change and those you can. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cites the following risk factors:

Risk Factors You Cannot Change

  • Getting older. The risk for breast cancer increases with age; most breast cancers are diagnosed after age 50.
  • Genetic mutations. Inherited changes (mutations) to certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Women who have inherited these genetic changes are at higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Reproductive history. Early menstrual periods before age 12 and starting menopause after age 55 expose women to hormones longer, raising their risk of getting breast cancer.
  • Having dense breasts. Dense breasts have more connective tissue than fatty tissue, which can sometimes make it hard to see tumors on a mammogram. Women with dense breasts are more likely to get breast cancer.
  • Personal history of breast cancer or certain non-cancerous breast diseases. Women who have had breast cancer are more likely to get breast cancer a second time. Some non-cancerous breast diseases such as atypical hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ are associated with a higher risk of getting breast cancer.
  • Family history of breast cancer. A woman’s risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, sister, or daughter (first-degree relative) or multiple family members on either her mother’s or father’s side of the family who have had breast cancer. Having a first-degree male relative with breast cancer also raises a woman’s risk.
  • Previous treatment using radiation therapy. Women who had radiation therapy to the chest or breasts (like for treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma) before age 30 have a higher risk of getting breast cancer later in life.
  • Women who took the drug diethylstilbestrol (DES), which was given to some pregnant women in the United States between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage, have a higher risk. Women whose mothers took DES while pregnant with them are also at risk.

Risk Factors You Can Change

  • Not being physically active. Women who are not physically active have a higher risk of getting breast cancer.
  • Being overweight or obese after menopause. Older women who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of getting breast cancer than those at a normal weight.
  • Taking hormones. Some forms of hormone replacement therapy (those that include both estrogen and progesterone) taken during menopause can raise risk for breast cancer when taken for more than five years. Certain oral contraceptives (birth control pills) also have been found to raise breast cancer risk.
  • Reproductive history. Having the first pregnancy after age 30, not breastfeeding, and never having a full-term pregnancy can increase your breast cancer risk.
  • Drinking alcohol. Studies show that a woman’s risk for breast cancer increases with the more alcohol she drinks.

Research suggests that other factors including smoking, being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer, and changes in other hormones due to night shift working may increase breast cancer risk.

Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

This article is intended to convey general educational information and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional healthcare advice.

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