Saturday, September 26, 2020
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Making it mean something

Hello my fellow fighters! Lately I have been thinking a lot about the journey my sickness has taken me and my family on, and how I can make something good out of it… Lemonade out of lemons (with a whole lot of added sugar, hehe), as one would say. For me, sharing my story and my knowledge on liver disease and transplants first hand, validates it some. If I can help to comfort at least one person, and show them that if a 5’1″, 115 pound, mousy sounding girl can do it then they can too, then it will be worth it to me (I was going to go through it whether I liked it or not anyway). But besides sharing my story, I feel it is just as important for me to spread awareness  on the need for organ donation. I, for one, wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for this life saving procedure and the kindness of others. In November 2009, my husband’s cousin Nancy, decided to give me part of her liver (54% to be exact). In July of 2010 we both went into surgery, and I came out feeling better then I had in years (Nancy sacrificed a piece of her liver and about 6 months of not feeling too hot, but she is back to perfect now). I had 3 great months, but then my new liver began failing with no explanation. By my 30th birthday in February, I was told I would need another liver. I got sicker and sicker, and began discussing my “final” plans with my husband, but it was another miraculous July for me. 1 year and 6 days after my first liver transplant, I received the news that they had another liver for me. It was the best and worst news. I was getting a second third chance at life, but the one that gave it to me this time, was gone. And I know first hand how fragile life is, no matter how sad, someday we all move on. So why not have some good come out of such a tragic event? Save some other families on your way out, that to me is what it is all about, that is humanity.

I know that my journey isn’t over yet, and I’ve still got a lot of stories in me. I’ll keep sharing them as long as someone reads ’em, in hopes that they will find comfort or knowledge. I hope that reading this one inspires you to share your story, you never know who you might touch. You might learn something about yourself too, like how strong you are, or that you’re not as alone as you thought. –I also hope this makes you think a little about organ donation. There is a shortage, you know… 18 men, women, and children die every day in the United States alone waiting for a life saving transplant. You could save 8 of those lives someday by signing up HERE right now.

Ricki

The informational content of this article is intended to convey general educational
information and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional healthcare advice.

This article is intended to convey general educational information and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional healthcare advice.

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